Honda Promises Two Sporty EVs, Including an NSX Successor

  • Honda teased two electric sports cars but did not specify a release date.
  • One is a flagship model with supercar dimensions from the mid-engine, and this NSX successor would most likely be badged Acura in the United States.
  • The other car, dubbed a “specialty” model by Honda, is higher and has more front-engined proportions.
Honda Promises Two Sporty EVs, Including an NSX Successor

Honda unveiled a slinky Sports Electric Vehicle concept in 2017 with classic style and tiny proportions. However, since then, the Japanese automaker’s future promises have centered on electric crossovers, such as the 2024 Prologue, which will use GM’s Ultrium batteries. Honda has now announced that two sports vehicles will be part of its electric expansion, as teased in a previous announcement on EV plans.

Honda Promises Two Sporty EVs, Including an NSX Successor

Honda has announced the global launch of two sports vehicles, one of which will be a “specialty” model and the other a “flagship.” The flagship car, shown above, resembles a low-slung supercar and is expected to be an electric successor to the NSX. If it ever makes it to the United States, it will very certainly be badged as an Acura, exactly like the current model. The specialty model, shown below, sits a little higher and has more front-engined proportions, although we’re not sure where this model will go, despite years of rumors of a “baby NSX.” Both cars will “embody Honda’s worldwide sports mindset,” according to Honda.

How to Fix P1101 Chevy Malibu?

Honda confirmed its intentions for the Prologue and a similar Acura EV SUV for 2024, both of which will employ GM’s batteries, in the same statement. Honda also stated that it is considering forming a joint-venture business for battery manufacture in North America, though this looks to be distinct from the recently announced joint venture with Sony, which will result in a new electric vehicle by 2025. Honda plans to deliver 30 electric vehicles globally by 2030, with a production volume of more than 2 million cars per year, thanks to its relationship with GM, which will result in “cheap” EVs by 2027.

Honda Promises Two Sporty EVs, Including an NSX Successor

Honda also stated that it will continue to research and develop solid-state batteries and that a demonstration manufacturing line will begin producing solid-state batteries in spring 2024. Honda anticipates that these batteries will be used in production vehicles by the end of the decade. To assist streamline production and cut costs, the business is also limiting the number of trim choices for its cars. Honda claims that it currently has half as many trim and option levels as it did in 2018, with a goal of reducing the number of submodels to one-third by 2025.

Leave a Reply